Hamptons Midsummer Night Drinks To Benefit God’s Love We Deliver

Torri Donley



God’s Love We Deliver guests enjoy last year’s event. (Photo: Jonathon Ziegler/PatrickMcMullan.com)

Richard and Marcia Mishaan are set to host God’s Love We Deliver’s Midsummer Night Drinks, one of the most anticipated events of the Hamptons summer season. On Saturday, June 20th from 6 to 9 p.m., guests will enjoy a memorable evening of delicious bites, cocktails, and music at the Mishaan’s Sagaponack home.

The soiree will benefit God’s Love We Deliver, the New York metropolitan area’s leading provider of life-sustaining meals and nutrition counseling for people living with severe illnesses. God’s Love cooks and home delivers the specific, nutritious meals a client’s severe illness and treatment so urgently require. With the demand for their services up 94 percent over the last eight years, this year’s Midsummer Night Drinks is more important than ever.

Tickets begin at $350.

For more information, visit www.glwd.org.

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