Be normal, Boise. Or be a Taco Cow. Restaurant to open with food ‘you’ve never seen.’

Torri Donley

If you’re wondering why restaurateur Boomer Godsill decided to name his new venture Taco Cow, well … His answer is moo. Located at 2032 E. Overland Road in Meridian, Taco Cow is a product of Godsill’s creative, sometimes random imagination. “I wanted it to be as unique as possible,” he […]

If you’re wondering why restaurateur Boomer Godsill decided to name his new venture Taco Cow, well …

His answer is moo.

Located at 2032 E. Overland Road in Meridian, Taco Cow is a product of Godsill’s creative, sometimes random imagination.

“I wanted it to be as unique as possible,” he explains. “There is really no rhyme or reason to ‘Taco Cow,’ other than it’s tacos, and they’re kind of bigger, interesting tacos.”

On track to open during the last week of October, Taco Cow will bring a slightly offbeat perspective to the dining scene in the Boise area. Focusing on takeout, the 1,200-square-foot restaurant will feature what Godsill describes as a three-tier menu.

1) Traditional Mexican tacos. Think carnitas or carne asada.

2) Modern choices, like a California-style taco with french fries in it. “Kind of a little bit unique to the (cuisine),” Godsill says in a phone interview, “but yet not off the wall.”

3) And lastly, a taco or two to make a purist have a cow. “From there it goes more into, ‘You’ve never seen this taco before. This is brand-new. Here you go!’ ”

Godsill is talking about the Boss Hogg, a fried bologna taco topped with “sweet heat” bacon, fried tomatoes, candied jalapenos and American cheese. Or maybe the Blanco Bacon Poutine: Idaho fries with the aforementioned bacon, plus white cheese and parsley. What about the Spicy Donkey? (He’s not even sure yet what’s going into that one.)

Want a taco that’s not exactly odd but sure sounds delicious? Order the Lobster Roll. That’s Taco Cow’s take on a Maine lobster roll.

Just want to play it safe? The signature Taco Cow is nothing but seasoned ground beef, shredded lettuce, cheese and tomatoes.

Taco prices mostly will be in the $2 to $2.50 range, Godsill said. (Although the Lobster Roll will cost around $4.) Tortillas, made in-house, primarily will be flour, although corn also will be included — and jicama for vegans. Speaking of vegetables? Taco Cow will serve a fried cauliflower taco, too.

Breakfast tacos will be available until 11 a.m. Taco Cow’s menu also will feature inexpensive Little Jefe Roll-Ups, “our homemade tortilla, cheddar cheese, and then the meat — and we roll it up,” Godsill says. “Kind of like a non-fried taquito.”

Beer and wine won’t be sold. (You can head next door to Biscuit & Hogs, which Godsill also owns, for that.) But Taco Cow will sell beverages including hand-pressed drinks “where we’ll use fresh fruits with a little bit of cane sugar,” Godsill says. “They’re very good.”

Hours will be 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Delivery will be available through third-party services such as DoorDash.

Although to-go orders will be the priority at Taco Cow, Godsill hopes to build a floating patio out front for outdoor dining, he says. In the winter, it would be heated and enclosed with plexiglass.

So does Godsill predict that Idaho will stampede Taco Cow for its udderly unusual eats?

“I think it’s going to take off,” he says. ”There are some interesting (tacos) on there, but for the most part, they’re all ingredients that people have had before. My opinion, it’s more like, ‘That’s interesting, that kind of sounds like it would go together,’ rather than, ‘What the hell is that?’ “

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©2020 The Idaho Statesman (Boise, Idaho)

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