All the reasons why N.J. is the center of the food universe

Torri Donley

Repeat after me: New Jersey is the center of the food universe.

If you live in New Jersey, you know this already.

If you live elsewhere, you’re cackling hysterically.

But as Jack Nicholson, the pride of Neptune, said in “A Few Good Men:” ”You can’t handle the truth!”

The truth is that food-wise, New Jersey takes a back seat to no one. No. One. We have it all here, in one compact package of a state. From high-end to low-rent, from fussy, white-tablecloth restaurants to sketchy yet delicious dives, New Jersey is food heaven.

And it’s time the rest of the world acknowledged us as such.

Cafe Matisse

Cafe Matisse in Rutherford

Consider the fine dining here: You don’t have to schlep into the city for the deluxe experience. Jersey City, Hoboken, Montclair and other cities are home to high-end restaurants the equal of NYC. Restaurant Serenade in Chatham. Fascino in Montclair.

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10 Food Rules You Can Throw Out Immediately, According to R.D.s

Torri Donley

Others implement a cut-off time to thwart their late-night cravings for snacky, “bad” foods. “The interesting thing is, this arbitrary rule might actually be contributing to your late-night cravings,” Vincci Tsui, R.D., anti-diet dietitian and certified intuitive eating counselor, tells SELF. “We all know that the more we tell ourselves that we can’t have something, the more that we want it, right?” Tsui says. When you give yourself permission to head to the kitchen at any hour, late-night snacks can become less “naughty” and enticing.

4. “Don’t emotionally eat.”  

The fact is that eating often is emotional, Lindsay Birchfield M.S, R.D., L.D., health and body activist and dietitian at Creating Peace With Food and Rooted Heart Health Care. “We eat to celebrate and we eat to mourn,” Birchfield says.

Eating for emotional comfort is problematized, but in reality it’s a lot like most other coping mechanisms: a tool intended to

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Food Sharing App Olio Launches New Craft Initiative

Torri Donley

With the sharing economy gaining traction over the last few years, following in the wake of the booming rental market, apps such as OLIO are playing a vital role in its success. And, with waste levels still at extortionate levels, the facilitation of these lifestyle shifts is becoming imperative in the creation of a circular economy.

According to a 2020 report by WRAP, while we have reduced our food waste by 7% per person in the last three years, UK households still waste 4.5 million tonnes of food that could have been eaten, amounting to a value of £14 billion every year (£700 for an average family with children). These statistics show the extortionate levels at which the western world continues to consume, emphasising

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Think you have a food allergy? Here’s what you need to know

Torri Donley

On Nutrition

Food sensitivities, intolerances and allergies are hot topics. A few weeks ago, I wrote about why it’s important to not self-diagnose gluten intolerance. Now, I want to turn to food allergies. If you have a true food allergy, you are already hyperaware of what that means. If you think you might have a food allergy, but aren’t sure, here’s why it’s also important to not fall down the self-diagnosis rabbit hole.

If it seems like food allergies are more common, it’s because they are. Food allergies have traditionally been more common in childhood, and while that’s still true, more adults — even older adults — are developing them. In this country, about 3-8% of children and 1-3% of adults have a food allergy. The most common child food allergies are to cow’s milk, eggs, wheat, fish and shellfish, peanuts, walnuts and soybeans. Among adults, fish and seafood, peanuts,

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How Canadian Food Buying And Cooking Habits Have Changed Due To Covid-19, According To Experts

Torri Donley

Earlier this year, for many Canadians, grocery shopping shifted from a weekly routine to a gladiatorial sport. In the rush to stock up on goods at the grocery store in the early days of the pandemic, some consumers overbought or hoarded, panicked at the potential disruption in the supply chain. As sales moved online for many, the adjustments in purchasing habits in the household changed not only how we consume food, but the effects of our purchasing habits on the amount we waste.

Over the course of the last few years, food waste has been a prominent concern for the foodservice industry, as climate change and natural disasters have placed increasing strain on the world’s resources. Now, new research places some of that attention on food waste in the home, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic has changed buying and spending habits for the foreseeable future. 

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Your Food Waste Has Global Impact

Torri Donley

You probably feel a little guilty about tossing leftovers. Throwing out uneaten food is a waste of the money you spent to buy it and the resources it took to grow and prepare it. But did you know that wasted food is so harmful that the United Nations has a campaign against it?

Last year, the UN designated September 29 as the International Day of Awareness on Food Loss and Waste Reduction. The name is a mouthful, but dealing with food waste is fundamental to the UN’s sustainability goal “Responsible Consumption and Production.” This goal directly supports two others: “Zero Hunger” and “Climate Action.”

Food loss is one of the root causes of hunger worldwide and accounts for 6% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

Pandemic Problem

Although the UN had already identified food loss and waste as an issue to address in 2020, the coronavirus pandemic has added new urgency

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Food Insecurity In The U.S. By The Numbers

Torri Donley

With COVID-19 continuing to spread, and millions of Americans still out of work, one of the nation’s most urgent problems has only grown worse: hunger.

In communities across the country, the lines at food pantries are stretching longer and longer, and there’s no clear end in sight. Before the pandemic, the number of families experiencing food insecurity — defined as a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life — had been steadily falling. But now, as economic instability and a health crisis takes over, new estimates point to some of the worst rates of food insecurity in the United States in years.

“COVID has just wreaked havoc on so many things: on public health, on economic stability and obviously on food insecurity,” said Luis Guardia, the president of the Food, Research and Action Center.

It’s a crisis that’s testing families, communities and the social safety

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For One Food Insecure Family, The Pandemic Leaves ‘No Wiggle Room’ : NPR

Torri Donley

Ja Nelle Pleasure relies on her garden for fresh fruits and vegetables. “Vegetables are expensive at the grocery store,” she says.

Dana Cronin/Harvest Public Media


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Dana Cronin/Harvest Public Media

Ja Nelle Pleasure relies on her garden for fresh fruits and vegetables. “Vegetables are expensive at the grocery store,” she says.

Dana Cronin/Harvest Public Media

Ja Nelle Pleasure never used to think twice about putting food on the table for her family.

In fact, the Pleasure family revolved around food. One of their favorite activities was to spin a globe, put a finger down and cook a dish from the country where it lands.

“It was a lot of fun because we got to eat all over the place, stuff that none of us would have dared try before, like silkworms,” she says. “They really look disgusting and scary. … But when you eat it, it tastes

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The future of food in a changing climate

Torri Donley

Princeton’s vital research across the spectrum of environmental issues is today and will continue to be pivotal to solving some of humanity’s toughest problems. Our impact is built on a long, deep, broad legacy of personal commitment, intellectual leadership, perseverance and innovation. This article is part of a series to present the sweep of Princeton’s environmental excellence over the past half-century.

Timothy Searchinger

In 1995, Timothy Searchinger found himself in Washington, D.C., poring over the United States Farm Bill. An environmental lawyer and policy expert on wetlands restoration at the time, Searchinger discovered an obscure provision in the Farm Bill that would allow states to direct funding toward conservation efforts. While his efforts led to the restoration of approximately 2 million acres of land back into environmentally valuable riparian buffers and wetlands, his work on the Farm Bill led to another equally important personal discovery.

“Here was

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MPs overturn measures designed to guarantee food standards post-Brexit

Torri Donley



a close up of a bird


© Provided by The Independent


MPs have overturned measures designed to protect domestic food standards in future trade deals, amid fears over chlorinated chicken.

The Commons voted by 332 votes to 279 to strike out a Lords amendment which would have required both agricultural and food imports to meet the UK’s standards after Brexit.

MPs were also denied a vote on a key measure designed to help prevent the likes of chlorinated chicken from America entering Britain.

Conservative MPs were among those who lined up to criticise the decision.

Neil Parish, the Tory chair of the Commons environment committee, complained that it was not beyond “the wit” of ministers in his own party to bring forward a way to give MPs the vote.

The row erupted as MPs considered a series of amendments to the Agriculture Bill currently going through parliament.

Just before a Commons debate on the Bill, they

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