Cooking tips to keep all campers happy

Torri Donley

If you’re a regular camper, it’s worth keeping a streamlined box full of the basics, that you don’t unpack between trips. Include a dedicated box of your utensils, with the all-important bottle opener, a wooden spoon, slotted spoon, fish slice, tongs, grater and wooden skewers. Always keep salt, sugar and […]

If you’re a regular camper, it’s worth keeping a streamlined box full of the basics, that you don’t unpack between trips. Include a dedicated box of your utensils, with the all-important bottle opener, a wooden spoon, slotted spoon, fish slice, tongs, grater and wooden skewers. Always keep salt, sugar and pepper in here too.

A few key spices will keep your food interesting. You can purchase a pack of four small plastic lidded pots or re-use those tiny jam jars from your cream tea. Smoked paprika, cumin, curry powder and cinnamon are good to take, as well as a box of stock cubes.

A small, screwtop bottle of oil – light olive oil is adaptable – is a must-have. Pack a sealable pot with butter if that’s non-negotiable on your campfire toast. The reason? The paper wrapper gets wet in the cool box and the butter can absorb other odours.

Couscous and bulgur wheat are great for camping as they don’t need a big pan of water to cook in. Mix together the couscous, half a crumbled stock cube, a little oil and seasoning in a jug or plastic box and just pour boiling water over to serve.

We’re not saying you should raid the service stations, but do hang on to your extra condiment sachets for camping, especially ketchup, vinegar, soy sauce, mayo and mustard – all things that you might use in small quantities.

Best for: Frequent campers, forgetful types, folks who like to stop at honesty boxes and improvise.

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