Phoenix-Mesa Gateway traffic is bouncing back; 6 pumpkin coffee drinks ranked; Tempe temporarily extends private security at parks

Torri Donley

A look at some of today’s top stories, the weather forecast and a peek back in history. Marsha Wohltman (left), Payton Wohltman, 9, (center) and Morgan Wohltman (right), walk through trees changing colors in Lockett Meadow as fall begins in Flagstaff, Ariz. on Oct. 10, 2020. The […]

A look at some of today’s top stories, the weather forecast and a peek back in history.

Arizona was once a sure bet for the GOP. Now it’s a key swing state in the election.

Roberta McCain, mother of John McCain and matriarch of the McCain family, dies at 108.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Arizona freezes 43,000 unemployment accounts suspected of fraud, affecting some legitimate claims.

From columnist E.J. Montini: The reason surging racism in Prescott should not surprise you.

From columnist Robert Robb: Never mind Proposition 207’s objective to legalize marijuana. The troubles are in the details.

Today, you can expect it to be sunny, with a high near 100 degrees. Clear at night, with a low near 68 degrees. Get the full forecast here.

Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport traffic is bouncing back. This is why travelers are returning

Over Labor Day weekend, Transportation and Security Administration officers at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport saw something they didn’t expect: more passengers. 

According to the airport, officers screened 9,221 passengers, slightly more than the 9,185 who went through the checkpoint in 2019. 

Normally, that might not be newsworthy. But these figures come as public health officials continue to advise against nonessential travel, something which has hammered air passenger traffic globally.

“We didn’t expect that and I think more importantly, the TSA didn’t expect that,” said Brian O’Neill, the executive director and CEO of Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport. “They were amazed to see that the numbers this year were stronger than the record-setting numbers last year.”

Find out why travelers are coming back to airports.

We ranked Starbucks, Dutch Bros and Dunkin’s 6 pumpkin coffee drinks from worst to best

Haters will say it doesn’t matter.

But for those die-hard pumpkin spice lovers out there, finding the best coffee drinks infused with fall’s favorite flavor is no frivolous task. 

It’s been nearly two decades since Starbucks debuted its Pumpkin Spice Latte in 2003, and these days there’s no shortage of competitors vying for customers’ dollars. From pumpkin spice candles to pumpkin spice SPAM, there’s a vast array of products allegedly flavored like winter squash and mixed spices. 

We haven’t managed to acquire any of Kraft’s pumpkin spice mac n’ cheese (yet), but we did try both hot and cold pumpkin-flavored coffee drinks at three of the country’s biggest coffee chains. 

Here’s how their options stacked up.



a close up of a laptop computer sitting on top of a coffee cup: Dutch Bros Coffee debuted a fall beverage lineup with both hot and cold beverages flavored with Caramel Pumpkin Bruee.


© Lauren Saria/The Republic
Dutch Bros Coffee debuted a fall beverage lineup with both hot and cold beverages flavored with Caramel Pumpkin Bruee.

Tempe temporarily extends G4S private security at parks, but may restore park rangers as a long-term fix

Private security guards will once again patrol Tempe parks on a temporary basis as some city leaders push to bring back a park ranger program.

The Tempe City Council recently instructed staff to extend the city’s contract with G4S, a global security services company, to provide immediate relief to parks after rising concerns from some residents about park safety and cleanliness in the last few months.

The uniformed guards — armed with guns, stun guns and pepper spray — had been patrolling Tempe parks as part of a pilot program since October 2018 but the program ended in June.

Read more about the city’s plans for security at parks.



a person standing on a sidewalk: G4S security guards Amanda Ladd and Payton Murrieta patrol Clark Park in Tempe on Nov. 16, 2018.


© Paulina Pineda/The Republic
G4S security guards Amanda Ladd and Payton Murrieta patrol Clark Park in Tempe on Nov. 16, 2018.

What to watch

A private plane experiencing hydraulic failure with its landing gear performs a belly landing on Oct. 11, 2020, in Mesa. 

Private plane performs belly landing in Mesa

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Today in history

  • On this date in 1908, a suit against six Yuma property owners was filed in federal court by the government to have land condemned for the construction of Laguna Dam.
  • In 1909, President William Howard Taft visited Arizona on a transcontinental tour and promised to do his best to bring statehood there.
  • In 1913, federal officials arrested the Justice of the Peace at Washington Camp, Arizona, after finding 10,000 rounds of ammunition in his possession. He was charged with running arms across the border.
  • In 1934, five prisoners broke out of the Holbrook Jail, locked the deputy in a cell, stole all the guns from the sheriff’s office and escaped in a stolen car.
  • In A.D. 54, Roman Emperor Claudius I died, poisoned apparently at the behest of his wife, Agrippina.
  • In 1775, the United States Navy had its origins as the Continental Congress ordered the construction of a naval fleet.
  • In 1792, the cornerstone of the executive mansion, later known as the White House, was laid by President George Washington during a ceremony in the District of Columbia.
  • In 1932, President Herbert Hoover and Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes laid the cornerstone for the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington.
  • In 1943, Italy declared war on Germany, its one-time Axis partner.
  • In 1944, during World War II, American troops entered Aachen (AH’-kehn), Germany.
  • In 1960, John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon held the third televised debate of their presidential campaign (Nixon was in Los Angeles, Kennedy in New York).
  • In 1972, a Uruguayan chartered flight carrying 45 people crashed in the Andes; survivors resorted to feeding off the remains of some of the dead in order to stay alive until they were rescued more than two months later.
  • In 1974, longtime television host Ed Sullivan died in New York City at age 73.
  • In 1999, the Senate rejected the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, with 48 senators voting in favor and 51 against, far short of the 67 needed for ratification.
  • In 2000, South Korean President Kim Dae-jung was named winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. Longtime American communist Gus Hall died in New York at age 90.
  • In 2003, the U.N. Security Council approved a resolution expanding the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Afghanistan.
  • In 2016, Donald Trump heatedly rejected the growing list of sexual assault allegations against him as “pure fiction,” hammering his female accusers as “horrible, horrible liars.” Bob Dylan was named winner of the Nobel prize in literature.

This article originally appeared on Arizona Republic: AZ Memo: Phoenix-Mesa Gateway traffic is bouncing back; 6 pumpkin coffee drinks ranked; Tempe temporarily extends private security at parks

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