Qantas selling off drinks trolleys, fully stocked with alcohol

Torri Donley

© Qantas The trolleys were used on the airline’s now retired Boeing 747 fleet. While COVID-19 has almost entirely been a non-stop stream of bad news for travel and aviation lovers, a silver lining has emerged for plane enthusiasts, interior designers and even quirky […]



The trolleys were used on the airline's now retired Boeing 747 fleet.


© Qantas
The trolleys were used on the airline’s now retired Boeing 747 fleet.

While COVID-19 has almost entirely been a non-stop stream of bad news for travel and aviation lovers, a silver lining has emerged for plane enthusiasts, interior designers and even quirky collectors.

Around the world, hundreds of aircraft sit parked at storage facilities. Some will be there for months or years, others will likely never leave.




a group of people sitting at a table


© Provided by Newshub


This has led to the sudden emergence of some rare collectable items being made available to the public. The latest is the iconic drinks trolley.  

Qantas is offering 1000 of its 747 galley carts stocked with a range of items from champagne and Australian red and white wine to Tim Tams, pyjamas and an exclusive-to-Qantas First Class Sheridan throw.

These bar carts were removed from the airline’s recently retired and much-loved 747 fleet before they were flown to the Californian desert.




a group of people in a room


© Provided by Newshub


Qantas operated various incarnations of the 747 ‘Queen of the Skies’ for almost 50 years before retiring the jumbo jet six months early as part of its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The farewell of the last Qantas 747 in July inspired an outpouring of affection and nostalgia from not just the Australian public, but travel lovers around the world.

Qantas executive manager of product and service Phil Capps said the airline wanted to offer up a unique opportunity for enthusiasts to own a physical piece of the 747 legacy, particularly at a time when travel was out of reach for many.

“These pre-loved carts served Qantas and our customers well during their world travels from London and Los Angeles to Singapore and Santiago, with each one averaging around 2000 flights. While we no longer have use for them, they still have life in them, especially for those with an appreciation for aviation collectables and an eye for design,” Capps said.






© Provided by Newshub


The Qantas 747 half bar cart features:



a circuit board


© Provided by Newshub


The trolleys start at around NZ$1000 or 169,000 Qantas Points. A full-sized cart with double the items is also available for around NZ$1600. 

While these prices include freight for Australians, sadly they aren’t available to us here in New Zealand.

While the bar carts are ‘second-hand’ and will show signs of wear and tear, they are soaking in history. Just imagine the thousands of people they’ve served, the places they’ve been and the conversations they have interrupted.

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